Child Brides in India and Nepal

Photo by Gagan Thapa

photo by Gagan Thapa

I was watching this documentary on Child Brides.
Although forbidden by law, it is still common use in India and Nepal for girls to be married off at a very young age:  2, 3 years old. They will live with their own family until they are sexually mature; then the girl leaves home for ever to live with her in-laws and her husband:  the beginning of a term of slavery to their mother-in-law. We’re talking kids here – 11, 12 year old girls.

Of course the marriage-bargain then gets clinched by the ‘deflowering’ of the young girl. And the girls getting pregnant at the onset of puberty: physically and in every other way not ready for pregnancy yet.  And every child birth a hazardous event. Child brides have a double pregnancy death rate of women in their 20s. In developing countries, the leading cause of death for young girls between the ages of 15 and 19 is early pregnancy.

The girl is expected to give birth to many, many children – as economical insurance for the future. A life of repeated pregnancies and unremitting childcare; that is, if they survive their first pregnancies. The people are very poor and the girls are often malnourished and (sexually) abused.

Where poverty is acute, a young girl may be regarded as an economic burden and her marriage to a much older – sometimes even elderly – man, a practice common in some Middle Eastern and South Asian societies, is a family survival strategy.

Those girls that dare to resist this culture and money based tradition, will be like a black sheep in her community – spit on and out-casted. Cultural, economic, and religious aspects of the communities where they live make it nearly impossible for the girls to break free from marrying early.

Education being an important key to ending child marriages, the girls never get to finish school, so they will not stand a chance to be financially independent.
Many believe that education may prove to be more successful in preventing child marriages than banning child marriages. Education together with an Equal Money System will proof to be even more successful – because the basic needs of each human being will be provided for, so there will be no more economical need for Child Brides. Every girl will be independent and free to arrange her life herself.

Overpopulation will slowly but surely diminish because there is no economical need for a bunch of children anymore. People educate themselves, parents and kids together, on how to live a dignified life and how to support other beings on this Earth in their right for a dignified life.
Read more on the Equal Money System as the Final Solution
here

starving-kids-india-child-poverty Equal Money

Some random facts on Child Brides:*
  • According to the International Centre for Research on Women (ICRW), 100 million girls will be married before the age of 18 in the coming decade. Most will be in sub-Saharan Africa and the Asian Subcontinent (Nepal, India, Pakistan, Bangladesh). In Niger, for example, 77% of women in their early 20s were married as children. In Bangladesh, 65% were. Child marriage also occurs in parts of the Middle East, including Yemen and the rural Maghreb.
  • In the United States, child marriage is still permissible in some states, with parental or judicial consent.
  • Globally, according to UNICEF, 36% of women aged 20-24 were married or in a union, forced or consensual, before they'd reached 18.
  • An estimated 14 million girls between the ages of 15 and 19 give birth each year. They are twice as likely to die during pregnancy or childbirth than women in their 20s.
  • Girls who marry between the ages of 10 and 14 are five times as likely to die during pregnancy or childbirth as women in their early 20s.

Upper photo by Gagan Thapa – see here his blog and FaceBook profile



We Destonians stand for the removal of this Money-Profit-God from the face of the Earth that always place money first and beings needs last. By implementing a new system, Equal Money, every single human being on this Earth will be provided with the basic needs, like food, housing, clothes, education, health care – equally. No one will have more or less. Removing the fear of survival (where money and profit comes in and with that in-equality because some have it all, and most have nothing: no food, shelter, medical care, education…) because survival is been taking care of. We will be free to express ourselves as we are. And profit making will be something of the past – gone – exit – basta
 
Visit Desteni and do your research on the guidelines for Equality and learn how to apply them. Also visit our Destonians Wiki on Wikipedia for an overview of what being a Destonian means.

  • I also highly recommend a view of what comes after child marriage. "Pink Saris" is a documentary by Kim Longinotto. The documentary centres on a woman who helps other women, who were married as children and then abused by the parents/father of the husband. It clearly shows the accepted and defended belief that females can be abused.

  • Thanks, I will see if I find this documentary. In the one I watched on televion this was also very clear. The (elderly) husband of a young girl admitting he sometimes tied her down to have sex with her - or beating her because of her resisting. And he wasn't ashamed of it - he said 'that's the way it is'. Nor did he brag about it, to him and probably most of the men this was just normal behavior.
    His bride wife was 15 years old and had already gone through multiply pregnancies, 3 babies born dead and some kids alive...
    It is really disturbing to see how 'low' females are valued.

  • I wish that the situation get better to everyone. Good luck for everyone.

  • that's my photo, (top), wondering where did you get it,

    gagan

  • There is such thing as women getting abuse from their in laws.

  • that picture is not a child bride,. its a KUMARI worshipped as living goddess in this heritaze country NEPAL. and please do not compare with the Indians.

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